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What I Learned From George Hyder, Master Trainer

 

 

As many of you know, our dear friend and colleague, George Hyder, passed away of a massive stroke on Wednesday, Jan. 25. He was only 37. Students and clients of Total Fitness will remember George as the head of Steel Ballet, perhaps the most well-established personal fitness training company in Atlanta. George subbed our yoga classes and taught with me at our 2000 Labor Day Yoga Retreat.

 

Although we could have viewed each other as competitors, we become not only friends but also personal coaches to each other. George Hyder taught me that the most important thing in life is to have a profound, positive impact on every person one encounters. Every day is an opportunity to touch a life in a positive way.

 

George lived his personal credo with total integrity. Often his mere presence would lighten up a room. He told me that on the way to his gym every morning, he would repeat the mantra to himself, “I have a profound, positive impact on everyone I meet.” He was totally focused on what he could provide for others. He called himself an old soul, and we swapped books about yoga philosophy, personal magneticism, leadership and spirituality.

 

I saw George on the Saturday and Sunday before he died. Although he hadn’t been feeling well, there was no sign of the finality of what was to come. As I look back on our last meetings, I have no regrets.

 

Both of us had already learned how to live life to the fullest. We told each other what mattered—including that we loved each other, and gave each other hugs. Nothing important remained unsaid. What a blessing it was for all of us to have known him. Now our only challenge is to live up to his example.

 

George Hyder, Expert on Attitude

 

 

The words of George Hyder: “The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think, say or do. It is more important than appearance, talent or skill. It will make or break an individual, business/ company. The wonderful thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will choose for that day. We cannot change our past. We can only predict our future by the attitude, not our aptitude, will determine our success for the future.

 

It’s a great day to get better!”

 

Water, Your Brain and Your Appetite

 

 

Because George Hyder’s kidneys failed shortly before he died, I am asking all my clients to remember to drink more water.

 

Many people don’t realize that all their neurotransmitters, the brain chemicals you need to feel alert and happy, are dependent on water. If you are dehydrated, your neurotransmitters won’t work as well, according to Sue Maes, the specialized kinesiologist with whom I have been studying in London, Ontario.

 

That’s important for all those who are wanting to control their appetites and overcome depression.

 

When your level of serotonin is low, you have very poor control over your appetite. Rats with low serotonin will eat forever.

 

I tell all my clients that if they don’t do anything I ask them other than drink more water, they will get better.

 

Adequate hydration is important not only for neurotransmitter function but also to maintain the digestive system, detoxify the body and lose weight. Body builders have learned the secret—many will drink as much as two gallons of day to slim down.

 

Water is the cheapest and healthiest appetite suppressant. It is also free and has no side effects!.

 

To Lose Weight, Monitor Your Fat Intake

 

 

Don’t be so concerned about your protein intake that you forget an indisputable fact: the body stores fat unbelievably efficiently.

 

Nutritionists recommend that you consume no more than 30 percent of your total calories from all sources of fat, and only 15 percent of total calories from saturated fat.

 

One gram of fat is equal to nine calories. That compares to 4 calories for each gram of protein or carbohydrates you consume.

 

Essential fatty acids are necessary for maintaining healthy cell walls, normal cholesterol metabolism and in the formation of important cell regulators called prostaglandins, hormone-like compounds involved in blood pressure and blood coagulation. But saturated fats and trans-fatty acids are the bad guys!

 

1,200 calories—Maximum 40 fat grams 1,500 calories—Maximum 50 fat grams 1,800 calories—Maximum 60 fat grams 2,000 calories—Maximum 66.6 fat grams

 

Trans Fatty Acids:

To Lower Your Cholesterol, Hold the Twinkies

 

 

It’s the truth: Butter is better for you than margarine. Why? Because research at Harvard has shown that trans fatty acids, which are formed when liquid fats are hardened via a process called hydrogenation, may cause even more damage than saturated fat because they lower the “good” cholesterol, HDL (high density lipoproteins).

 

Read your labels and avoid hydrogenated fats in processed foods as much as possible.

 

Butter is still not off the hook, however, because many Americans exceed the recommendations of 15 percent of daily calories from saturated fat.

 

Nutritionists recommend that you replace margarine with mono– and polyunsaturated oils, like sunflower, safflower and soybean oils.