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Catherine Carrigan has been asked to become the mind-body fitness expert for a new web site, www.aboutstress.com. “It is highly exceptional to find someone with so many admirable and pertinent qualities: the breadth of understanding, holistic approach, diverse involvement in educating both professionals and the public alike, with such obvious intelligence and ability to articulate information in as readable, entertaining and informative style as Catherine Carrigan,” says Martin Shaffer, Ph.D., executive director of the Stress Management Institute, which has offices in San Fransisco, Sacramento, and San Jose.

 

Integrative Yoga Therapy:

A System of Using Yoga for Healing

 

What’s the key to becoming a master at whatever you do? Keep learning. Always be doing your best to do at least one thing better. That way, neither you nor your students ever get bored. That way, achieving peak performance becomes a matter of joyful routine.

 

That’s what I learned many years ago from one of the top physical educators in the country, Len Kravitz, Ph.D. Ever since, I have been following his advice, and every year, I do my best to earn at least one new certification in the field of health and fitness.

 

This July, I will begin earning my third certification in yoga — Integrative Yoga Therapy, a system of using yoga for healing.

 

Integrative Yoga Therapy combines the timeless insights of yoga with the latest advancements in mind/body health. Its guiding vision is to bring total wellness into all areas of life and into the medical, mental health, corporate and educational settings, both through group classes and individual yoga therapy sessions.

 

Whether your challenge is heart disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, depression, diabetes, recovery from drugs or alcohol or many other health concerns, these techniques are already used in hospitals around the world.

 

Think Ahead:

When to Eat Your Carbs, When to Hold Them

 

When it comes to eating, one of the best rules is to think ahead.

 

Many of us mindlessly eat the same meals whether or not we are planning to be exercising. Sports nutritionists have taught us one principle that most of us would do well to incorporate every day: Think before you eat.

 

Because carbohydrates are an energy source, we need them when we plan to be working out. However, we need fewer carbohydrates—read twinkies, Ho-hos, bread, rice and potatoes—when we plan to be mostly sitting.

 

When you eat your meals, ask yourself, “What am I going to be doing over the next 3 to 5 hours?” Eat fewer calories and fewer carbohydrates when you plan to be sitting. On days when you don’t exercise, cut back on your portions in general to avoid weight gain.

 

Upcoming Total Fitness Classes

 

Atlanta: Brain Gym I: July 8-9 and Aug. 25-26. Brain Gym II: Sept. 30-Oct. 1. Labor Day Yoga Retreat: Sept. 1-4.

 

Ayer, Mass.: Brain Gym I and II: Aug. xxx and Sept. 9-11. Weight Loss, Exercise and Spirituality: Sept. 12-14. Vision Circles: Sept. 15-17.

 

For more information about these classes, or to register, please contact Catherine Carrigan, 404-350-8581 or Camie Larson, 978-772-0418, or email us at daylilly@aol.com, or edukcamie@juno.com.